The History of Camden Market

The Origin of the Market

It was March 1974 that a Saturday market was opened in the Camden Town area of London, with only 16 traders setting up their stalls for custom. 100 years prior to the first market, the area was a more industrial location, the focus mainly on production and distilleries, with the introduction of the market helping the transformation of the area to its current, more recognizable state; A tourist hotspot of hotel offers and trendy stalls.

**The Cultural Evolution of Camden Town

Alongside the opening of the market, Camden Town was also undergoing a cultural transformation, beginning in the 1970’s, that would help to propel the area into the contemporary present. Dingwalls Dance Hall is a venue in the area that is famous for pioneering live music concerts, featuring bands such as The Rolling Stones and Pink Floyd. The venue continues its legacy today as a popular venue for famous artists to perform. Alongside the musical aspects, Camden Town also developed through fashion. The market became a key hub for those seeking an alternative fashion style. Many young and established designers opened stalls at the growing market, allowing them an easy and accessible way of sharing their new styles with the world. In the modern market, many retro brands and styles can still be found.

The Modern Market

Camden Market is now a vital, trendy hub of activity within London, boasting a diverse selection of trade, through both stores and food. There is now over 1000 stalls within the market, which is no longer restricted to just Saturdays, opening every day of the week. In addition to the local customers, the market is now a key tourist destination, with many hotel offers capitalising on the popularity of the area. The market now attracts approximately 27 million visitors a year, becoming the fourth most popular attraction within London.

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